Antique brass candlesticks odd design old but?

Discussion in 'Metalware' started by Richard C, Jun 29, 2019.

  1. Richard C

    Richard C New Member

    Certain aspects of this 6" candlesticks would make me date it around 1750, notable the turned bottoms, the weight, which is heavier, lack of a seam and honest wear. But one of the pair has a push up, the other one had one but lost it. I have not even been able to find a match for this pattern. Possibly the pushups are later? Has anyone seen this design before? Any opinions appreciated.
     

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  2. i need help

    i need help Well-Known Member

    Clearly you are very knowledgeable on the subject. The closest I see to that design, was on some trumpet candlesticks, but none were this shape.
     
  3. Richard C

    Richard C New Member

    Thanks for your response I need help. That gives me another avenue to explore.
     
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  4. i need help

    i need help Well-Known Member

    Maybe @Rod knows.
     
  5. Jeff Drum

    Jeff Drum Well-Known Member

    Do you have the Brass Book by Schiffer? If you collect old brass it is definitely worth getting, either as a used book or from the library. The base is identical to a candlestick they date 1820-1860 (p.173, B). Also, the wide cast in place bobeche, general shape and lack of a seam in the stick itself indicates 19th century to me. I think the pushups are original.
     
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  6. Richard C

    Richard C New Member

    I don't have the Schiffer book, the library in my old town had it but they don't have it here. The thing that threw me off was the lathe-turned bases which I thought was no longer done after late 18c. "They also can be dated by the way they were made. Before the 19th century the stem and socket were hollow cast in two pieces and then brazed together. Some in the 18th and 19th centuries were cast. Because they were finished on one of the 18th century lathes, their lathe marks . . . concentric lines . . . can still be seen on the base."
     
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  7. Jeff Drum

    Jeff Drum Well-Known Member

    Lathe turning brass is still a good way to remove excess material. All good quality cymbals are still made this way. And you sometimes see lathe marks on round 20th century brass items from China, India, middle-east.
     
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