Antique DELFT: Do you know maker, age or anything else?

Discussion in 'Pottery, Glass, and Porcelain' started by Studio Antiques, Jun 24, 2017.

  1. Studio Antiques

    Studio Antiques Well-Known Member

    My guess is that this mark is the stork, but a bit more stylized. Do you think I'm correct? That would date it to c. 1775-85 which seems a bit older than expected. Your thoughts on age and maker? TIA! :) delft1.JPG delft2.JPG delft3.JPG delft4.JPG
     
  2. Walter Del Pellegrino

    Walter Del Pellegrino Well-Known Member

    Best Answer
    The Cantagalli mark, a singing cockerel, is the most faked of all the Italian pottery logos of the 19th and early 20th century. The mark itself is meant to be a play on the family name Canta (Sing) and Galli (Rooster or Cockerel). I was fully prepared to dismiss this piece and declare it a fake but there are some aspects that gives me cause to pause.
    The Chiniosiere pattern was a style that was imported to Europe from China around 1700. The design fell out of popularity about fifty years later. It was made popular again during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s by the Cantagalli factory. Many studio’s copied the style. Below is an article I wrote back in 2009. It highlights a 19th century vase decorated in the same pattern. The use of Magenta against a white ground rather than the traditional blue and white, as copied by the English and French, seems to predominate the Italian interpretation of the Chinese design. So far the piece remains a “maybe”.
    Then there is the matter of the mark. The Cantagalli factory revived itself in 1890 when the brothers Ugo and Romeo inherited the studio. Up until that period the family business was strictly inexpensive tableware (stoviglieri). The brothers wanted to concentrate on exports and decorative ceramic items. In order to comply with English and US customs the country of origin had to appear on the piece. This item is missing that label. It might have been an oversight or the piece was not meant for export, or more likely, it is not a Cantagalli piece. The logo was usually made in a deep purple color but this logo is the same color as the basic design of the plate. In the early years the skilled Cantagalli decorators signed their works with a studio designated number. This piece lacks that detail.
    The shape of the bowl is almost distinctly Italian. I say almost because the shape also seems to dominate the wares from Moustier, France. But still, the bowl is more Italian than anything else.
    Based on all of the above I would suggest that the bowl is late 19th, early 20th century Italian but not attributable to the Cantagalli family.
    Walter

    http://italianpotterymarks.freeforu...-deruta-explain-why-i-am-a-collector-t36.html
     
    komokwa, gregsglass and say_it_slowly like this.
  3. kentworld

    kentworld Well-Known Member

    I think that's a cockerel which is a mark used by the Cantagalli company of Italy. However, it is a mark that is faked.
     
  4. kentworld

    kentworld Well-Known Member

  5. Studio Antiques

    Studio Antiques Well-Known Member

    Thanks! This is definitely not a faked mark. I'll check it out further :)
     
  6. say_it_slowly

    say_it_slowly The worst prison is a closed heart

    Studio Antiques likes this.
  7. Studio Antiques

    Studio Antiques Well-Known Member

    @kentworld, you don't think it is from Holland then but Italy?
     
  8. kentworld

    kentworld Well-Known Member

    I wouldn't know for sure, but the design looks more Italian than Dutch to me. Walter would know for sure.
     
    yourturntoloveit likes this.
  9. say_it_slowly

    say_it_slowly The worst prison is a closed heart

  10. tyeldom3

    tyeldom3 Well-Known Member

  11. Walter Del Pellegrino

    Walter Del Pellegrino Well-Known Member

    Best Answer
    The Cantagalli mark, a singing cockerel, is the most faked of all the Italian pottery logos of the 19th and early 20th century. The mark itself is meant to be a play on the family name Canta (Sing) and Galli (Rooster or Cockerel). I was fully prepared to dismiss this piece and declare it a fake but there are some aspects that gives me cause to pause.
    The Chiniosiere pattern was a style that was imported to Europe from China around 1700. The design fell out of popularity about fifty years later. It was made popular again during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s by the Cantagalli factory. Many studio’s copied the style. Below is an article I wrote back in 2009. It highlights a 19th century vase decorated in the same pattern. The use of Magenta against a white ground rather than the traditional blue and white, as copied by the English and French, seems to predominate the Italian interpretation of the Chinese design. So far the piece remains a “maybe”.
    Then there is the matter of the mark. The Cantagalli factory revived itself in 1890 when the brothers Ugo and Romeo inherited the studio. Up until that period the family business was strictly inexpensive tableware (stoviglieri). The brothers wanted to concentrate on exports and decorative ceramic items. In order to comply with English and US customs the country of origin had to appear on the piece. This item is missing that label. It might have been an oversight or the piece was not meant for export, or more likely, it is not a Cantagalli piece. The logo was usually made in a deep purple color but this logo is the same color as the basic design of the plate. In the early years the skilled Cantagalli decorators signed their works with a studio designated number. This piece lacks that detail.
    The shape of the bowl is almost distinctly Italian. I say almost because the shape also seems to dominate the wares from Moustier, France. But still, the bowl is more Italian than anything else.
    Based on all of the above I would suggest that the bowl is late 19th, early 20th century Italian but not attributable to the Cantagalli family.
    Walter

    http://italianpotterymarks.freeforu...-deruta-explain-why-i-am-a-collector-t36.html
     
    komokwa, gregsglass and say_it_slowly like this.
  12. Walter Del Pellegrino

    Walter Del Pellegrino Well-Known Member

    Any Jewelry and komokwa like this.
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