Unusual Staffordshire deer w/ flowers. Is this some sort of Dresden lace? Any idea on when made?

Discussion in 'Pottery, Glass, and Porcelain' started by sunday silence, Jun 10, 2021 at 6:01 PM.

  1. sunday silence

    sunday silence Well-Known Member

  2. wiscbirddog

    wiscbirddog Well-Known Member

    The extremely large vent hole is indicative of 20th century manufacture.
     
  3. moreotherstuff

    moreotherstuff Izorizent

    The vent hole is not good, but they're still a very attractive pair. The screen-like foliage backing the pieces is called bocage (brocage?).
     
  4. Any Jewelry

    Any Jewelry Well-Known Member

    Brocage.:)
     
    Darkwing Manor likes this.
  5. moreotherstuff

    moreotherstuff Izorizent

    This was my first thought, but I figured I'd better be sure of the definition before posting, so I looked it up online and brocage didn't work. Bocage, on the other hand, is a screen of trees or foliage and is applied to this use in ceramics.

    So I searched online, and both spellings returned examples, which is why I used both in my response.

    But now I've gone and looked at some of my auction catalogs, and both Christie's and Sotheby's say "bocage", no letter r.

    If I was listing and had the space, I'd probably use both.
     
  6. Any Jewelry

    Any Jewelry Well-Known Member

    In English I used to see brocage a lot, but in French it would be bocage, describing a backdrop of trees or a piece of land surrounded by trees.
    To complicate matters, we use the French word coulisse in Dutch for the landscape feature, as well as for the backdrop and wings of a theatre stage.;)

    I would also use both terms in a listing.
     
  7. Ownedbybear

    Ownedbybear Well-Known Member

    I've always seen it as bocage, sans r.

    They're nicely done, those.
     
  8. sunday silence

    sunday silence Well-Known Member

    sold for $1100 so I guess it was very nicely done
     
  9. moreotherstuff

    moreotherstuff Izorizent

    I'd like to know what the buyer knew.
     
    judy and Any Jewelry like this.
  10. DizzyDaff

    DizzyDaff Member

    I adore the knowledge floating around here!!! Y'all are awesome! :bookworm:
     
    Darkwing Manor and Any Jewelry like this.
  11. moreotherstuff

    moreotherstuff Izorizent

    Slip casting is inimical to the notion of 19th C Staffordshire for figurines like these. It does usually indicate a later date, but date isn't everything, nor are all such figures Staffordshire. Slip casting was developed in the 18th C, so it's not even a sure thing that it means a later date.
     
    judy likes this.
  12. sunday silence

    sunday silence Well-Known Member

    exactly
     
    Any Jewelry likes this.
  13. sunday silence

    sunday silence Well-Known Member

    what about the base? The glaze appears to have flowed onto the bottom/base during the process. Is that an indication of a little older type?
     
  14. sunday silence

    sunday silence Well-Known Member

    also what are those square shaped holes in the backside? Are those meant to hold something?
     
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