Just a Rock, or a Native American Stone?

Discussion in 'Tribal Art' started by Joan, Mar 31, 2020.

  1. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    GraniteStone-1.jpg GraniteStone-2a.jpg GraniteStone-3.jpg GraniteStone-6.jpg
    I found this granite stone underground when we dug out and replaced a drain pipe in our yard (I live in Wisconsin along a river/lake). After handling it, I noticed it fit perfectly in my hand when grabbing it on either of the long edges, and wondered if it could have been a Native American tool or weapon. It's a little flatter on one side than the other, the long edges are smoother than the ends, and one long edge is thinner than the other. I looked online at examples of NA tools and weapons, and read about how to tell the difference between an ordinary rock and a NA item, but couldn't see any specific characteristics of a NA item on this rock. Does anyone have opinions one way or the other?
     
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  2. Bronwen

    Bronwen Well-Known Member

    I was ready to say 'river rock' even before reading you live near one. Not to say someone, not necessarily NA, did not once find it fit well & was pleasing in their hand too. It doesn't look like anyone has been pounding or hammering with it.
     
  3. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    Although it doesn't have any signs of pounding or hammering, it weighs close to 4 lbs., so I'm wondering if rocks like this were ever used as a weapon to throw at or strike an animal or enemy. Maybe not, since they had stone axes and arrows.
     
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  4. clutteredcloset49

    clutteredcloset49 Well-Known Member

    I was going to say the same thing. I didn't read the description.
     
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  5. komokwa

    komokwa The Truth is out there...!

    river rock..
     
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  6. Rayo56

    Rayo56 Well-Known Member

    I've found rocks that look just like that down in the Vermilion River valley (Vermilion, Ohio). If you break them open (I used to polish rocks) they glimmer inside like they have quartz in them. Get them wet and they turn a pinkish hue.
    Yes, so river rock.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
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  7. all_fakes

    all_fakes Well-Known Member

    It is just a rock.
     
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  8. Rayo56

    Rayo56 Well-Known Member

    I looked through some polished rocks I still had in the cabinet - they are real easy to spot. These are what they turn out like when broken into smaller pieces and then tumble polished. It is a very hard rock so indeed it might be granite - made up of mostly mica and quartz.
    000_4646.jpg
     
  9. 2manybooks

    2manybooks Well-Known Member

    River rock. I once tried to explain to someone that they just had a rock when they were convinced their vaguely foot-shaped stone was a "moccasin last". So many things wrong with that idea.....
     
  10. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    As I said in my post, the rock I found is granite, which is one of the types of stone used by Native Americans. But I accept the consensus here that it's just a river rock. Below is a photo of what's called a NA pecking stone (Arrowheads.com). If I stumbled across it in a field, I'd never guess it was a NA tool. Thank you to everyone who took time to offer their opinions :happy:.
    pecking-stone.jpg
     
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  11. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    Just a side note, I grew up on a farm and would sometimes have to "pick" rocks from my dad's newly-plowed fields. One of my brothers acquired quite a collection of arrowheads and even a large ax head that he later gave to a member of the Lacota people.
     
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  12. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    Yes, granite -- like countertops and gravestones.
     
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  13. flipper

    flipper Striving to face adversity with tact and humor

    upload_2020-3-31_18-48-55.jpeg If you think it is special, it is...I have lots of rocks...not sure why, but sometimes they just speak to you.
     
  14. 2manybooks

    2manybooks Well-Known Member

    Yes, smooth stones that fit nicely in the hand could be used in working flint. But if there is no evidence of such use on the stone, then it is impossible to say it was a tool (unless there was a specific context - like, found next to a pile of flakes).
     
  15. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    I don't know why I think it's special when I see houses made with tons of river rock, but there was something about this rock that made me want to pick it up and keep it. It comes in handy when I need to hold something in place, flatten something, or prop a door open :happy:.
    riverrockhouse2.jpg
     
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  16. Aquitaine

    Aquitaine Is What It IS! But NEVER BORED!

    One of the beaches on Block Island (RI) where the surf is heavier, and just rolls and rolls and rolls them around until the rocks look like all sorts and sizes of your shaped rock! They've been rolling around for eons to get to look like that....same as in rivers!! Some Islanders don't want us to take them.... afraid we'll 'strip the beach' of them.... HA!! AS IF!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  17. komokwa

    komokwa The Truth is out there...!

    I have several smooth interesting rocks , picked up around the world.
    One day , someone will throw them out....along with my arrowhead...my celt , my Haida Argillite , and other bits and bobs I've picked up along the way ......
    But at least.....they served me well !!!
     
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  18. say_it_slowly

    say_it_slowly STAY SAFE The worst prison is a closed heart

    I love rocks! There is something so lovely about the feel of so many and some just feel perfect in your hand. I also will pick up a stone and use it as a hammer or other tool when it's handy. Many stones are just that, stones, no matter how perfect they might be as tools.

    All that said, having been with archaeologists who "know" stones, you look for evidence of use. In the case of the pecking stone, there would likely be multiple mini chips on the ends. Now for a mano/grinding tool I'm not as clear as to how you can identify the wear. Might be something to research. Many states have local and state archaeologists who can look at things. In the current climate you might try sending photos.

    In the meantime you have a nice rock:)
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
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  19. Joan

    Joan Well-Known Member

    Thank you say_it_slowly for saying that I have a nice rock, and also for your suggestion about contacting an archaeologist. I did find that the Wisconsin Archaeological Society encourages people to email questions and photos of items they find, so I may do that sometime.

    I've enjoyed reading what others on this forum like/love about rocks they've found, and that probably have little or no monetary value.
     
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  20. Bronwen

    Bronwen Well-Known Member

    At my house that nice smooth, flat rock would end up as turtle furniture. :turtle::turtle:
     
    Joan likes this.
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