Featured Pyrography / painted wood candle holder? with poppies

Discussion in 'Antique Discussion' started by aaroncab, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    This caught my eye so I brought it home. It's 10 inches tall (26cm). Decorated with poppies. Assuming it's a candle holder (wish I had a pair of them), the opening at the top is 1.5 inches in diameter and 3.5 inches deep.

    Looks like it was turned on a lathe and then decorated using pyrography and painted. I love the poppies, and that about sums up my opinion on this :) Anyhow - probably impossible to tell but - thinking this is probably continental European but I don't know how to narrow down from there. Seems to have some age on it to me - maybe early to mid 20th? Thanks for taking a look!

    49166896642_6ae4c0c66f_kdev.jpg 49166658901_1487388f7e_kdev.jpg 49166896742_8d08a93e5d_kdev.jpg 49166896832_238cc863e1_kdev.jpg 49166184638_65bdcef909_kdev.jpg 49166184593_b2f1c8ad08_kdev.jpg 49166184683_4c92b46ac1_kdev.jpg 49166184788_4b9264c328_kdev2.jpg
    49166659201_c355e09a5a_kdev2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2019
  2. Bakersgma

    Bakersgma Well-Known Member

    I think it is very nice, Aaron!
     
  3. i need help

    i need help Well-Known Member

    Very detailed and colorful! :)
     
  4. judy

    judy Well-Known Member

  5. Christmasjoy

    Christmasjoy Well-Known Member

    LOVE IT !!! ... Joy. .. :):):):)
     
  6. pearlsnblume

    pearlsnblume Well-Known Member

  7. clutteredcloset49

    clutteredcloset49 Well-Known Member

    Pyrography was often done by a hobbyist.
    They sold kits with patterns to use.

    Popular during the early 1900s.

    Forgot to say that is a lovely piece.
    And thinking about the Poppies, might be WWI era.
     
  8. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    Thanks Pat!
     
  9. Figtree3

    Figtree3 What would you do if you weren't afraid?

    That is the most beautiful pyrography item I have ever seen!

    It seems that it would take some skill for a hobbyist to work with the curved surface so well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
  10. Ownedbybear

    Ownedbybear Well-Known Member

    Someone liked Moorcroft. I'd agree on it being just post WW1, when the poppy thing really got going. It is very like much Art Nouveau pottery in style, too.
     
  11. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    Thanks OBB, spot on with the moorcroft comparison!
     
    judy, i need help and Ownedbybear like this.
  12. anundverkaufen

    anundverkaufen Well-Known Member

    I don’t think a 1-1/2” x 3-1/2” cup is for a candle, not sure what though.
    Is there writing in there?
     
  13. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    No writing, just random variations of color. Hmmmm cant think of what other purpose that hole would serve....
     
    judy likes this.
  14. i need help

    i need help Well-Known Member

    Pokerwork Baluster Vase
    Seems to bring smallish styles opening.
     
    Figtree3, judy and aaroncab like this.
  15. Bronwen

    Bronwen Well-Known Member

    Looks dangerously top heavy for use as a candle holder. Is the well the right size for a taper?
     
    judy, aaroncab and i need help like this.
  16. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    You're probably right ...although it's not quite as top heavy as it might appear. The opening is too big for a taper, but would perhaps fit certain pillar candles. It's 1 1/2" in diameter and 3 1/2" deep.
     
    judy, Bronwen and i need help like this.
  17. aaroncab

    aaroncab in veritate victoria

    Thanks INH - that search does bring up some fairly similar items!
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
    judy, Bronwen and i need help like this.
  18. clutteredcloset49

    clutteredcloset49 Well-Known Member

    Good chance this is one of the Flemish Art Co. pieces. In trying to discover what your "vase/candlestick" is I came across a very interesting site.

    This explains a little better about pyrography kits. Why some appear better done than others. Also may have been manufactured.

    "According to antique collectors Richard and Carole Smyth of Huntington, NY, in their book, The Burning Passion, the factories were not only manufacturing the pyrographic kits, including instructions, unfinished wood pieces for the hobbyist to buy and decorate, and paints to further enhance the woodburned items, they were also selling some unfinished wood items with a design pre-stamped on them (usually in purple or brown ink) for the hobbyist to burn over. Not only that, they were supplying some unfinished wood pieces with a design already pyroengraved by means of a heated engraving plate, ready for the hobbyist to paint only. This type of preparation is called "scorched" and is also sometimes referred to as "stamped" (not to be confused with those stamped with ink)."
    From the bottom of this page
    http://carverscompanion.com/Ezine/Vol2Issue1/Menendez/Antiquep2.html

    The home page
    http://pyromuse.org/index.html
     
    cxgirl, aaroncab, Bronwen and 2 others like this.
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