Trying to identify a print stamp and print origin

Discussion in 'Sell' started by Jane Henry, Mar 25, 2020.

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Any thoughts on age or origin? Worth selling or saving?

  1. Yes

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  2. No

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  3. Maybe

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  1. Jane Henry

    Jane Henry Active Member

    BEB385FD-F97D-4DA5-BEF0-010CFDF2C4EB.jpeg I’m not a print expert. I found these pieces inside the backing of a gilded mirror I was restoring. This is not the first time it’s happened. Anyone have any background info? The women with dog has a stamp and word which I’ve attached.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  2. i need help

    i need help Well-Known Member

    AAC35133-B54D-41D0-AC6E-04F74A3CD524.jpeg Can you please hit edit, More Options, check display Full Image, save changes.
     
  3. clutteredcloset49

    clutteredcloset49 Well-Known Member

  4. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

    Claude Duval is the title of an oil on canvas work by William Powell Frith (1819-1909.) It was painted 1859-1860. The original is in the Manchester Art Gallery.

    "Scene depicting a group of highwaymen holding up the carriage of Lady Aurora Sydney carrying a young woman who has been made to dance with the captain of the band of men, Claude Duval, as part of her ransom. The event takes place on a bleak heathland road under a cloudy sky. In the centre of the composition are the dancing figures of captor and hostage: he stands masked, with his right arm raised, his left hand (holding a feathered cap) placed on his hip and his right foot pointed forward, facing away from the viewer; she stands forward-facing, holding her skirts out to the side, with her left foot pointed forward, an alarmed expression on her face."

    Debora

    GMIII_MCAG_1917_270-001.jpg
     
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  5. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

    For some reason, in your photograph you've cut off the title of the work which looks like a royal barge scene on the Thames. A Google internet search should provide you with more information.

    Debora
     
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  6. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

    The portrait is Mrs. Mary Robinson (Perdita) by Thomas Gainsbourgh (1727-1788.) It's an oil on canvas work painted in 1781. The original is in the Wallace Collection.

    "The seventeen-year-old Prince of Wales (later George IV) became infatuated with Mrs Robinson (1758–1800) in 1779 on seeing her as Perdita in 'The Winter’s Tale' at the Drury Lane Theatre. ‘Perdita’, as she was thereafter nicknamed, became his first mistress. Towards the end of 1780, the Prince abandoned her for a rival, and she spent the following eight months struggling to persuade him to honour his obligations."

    Debora

    WLC_WLC_P42-001.jpg

     
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  7. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

    None of these prints is likely to be of import. Their condition is not good, with discolorations, tears and what appears to be insect damage.

    Debora
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  8. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

  9. Jane Henry

    Jane Henry Active Member

    I think I just did, not sure it worked.
    Wow! that was fast. Thanks so much.
     
  10. Jane Henry

    Jane Henry Active Member

    Such a speedy reply. Thank you so much. I’m clearing out my studio during this lull in business and am weeding through a large collection of mystery items I’ve obtained by default over the years.
     
  11. moreotherstuff

    moreotherstuff Izorizent

    Certainly the first looks like a steel plate engraving, the others could be a different reproduction technique (and I could be wrong about the first). None are particularly old. Given the condition, I doubt they have any value to speak of.
     
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  12. Jane Henry

    Jane Henry Active Member

    Thanks for your input.
     
  13. Debora

    Debora Well-Known Member

    Value could be effected by scarcity. You might want to see if you can find duplicates on internet. Graves' was well respected.

    "In the course of an enterprising and successful career, throughout which he was recognised as the leading London printseller, Graves published an immense number of fine engravings from pictures by Turner, Wilkie, Lawrence, Constable, Landseer, Faed, Frith, Grant, Millais, and other contemporary painters."

    Debora
     
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  14. Figtree3

    Figtree3 What would you do if you weren't afraid?

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  15. Jane Henry

    Jane Henry Active Member

    Thanks!
     
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